Past Events


July 2022

Morning Larks and Night Owls Shed Light on the Molecular Circadian Clock

Professor Carrie Partch
Monday, July 11th, 2022
6:30-8:00 p.m.  

Our lives are intimately linked to Earth’s 24-hour solar cycle via circadian clocks that coordinate our physiology and behavior into rhythms that coincide with the day/night cycle. The Partch lab has been working to identify how dedicated clock proteins interact with one another to establish a deeper understanding of the molecular clock that underlies circadian rhythms in humans. Recent insights into the genetic basis of morning lark and night owl behavior have shed light on key steps in the clock that play a powerful role in determining the intrinsic timing of circadian clocks in humans. Some of these recent advances will be discussed to explore the biochemical basis for circadian timekeeping.

Watch the event here.

 

 

June 2022

Invited to Witness: Solidarity Tourism across Occupied Palestine

Associate Professor Jennifer Lynn Kelly
Tuesday June 14th, 2022
6:30-8:00pm

Drawing from her research on solidarity tours in Palestine, Jennifer Kelly shows how solidarity tourism in Palestine functions as a fraught localized political strategy, and an emergent industry, through which Palestinian organizers refashion conventional tourism to the region by extending deliberately truncated invitations to tourists to come to Palestine and witness the effects of Israeli state practice on Palestinian land and lives. She shows how Palestinian organizers both extend and redefine this invitation to witness, as well as intervene in tourist demands for evidence and desire for performances of trauma by asking tourists to instead confront the violence of their own desire in Palestine. She also details the conditions that have led Palestinians to make their case through solidarity tourism in the first place, describing the ways in which tourists travel to Palestine to see the effects of Israeli occupation for themselves despite the volumes of literature Palestinians have produced on their own condition. In this way, Kelly shows how Palestinian organizers, under the constraints of military occupation, and in a context in which they do not control their borders or the historical narrative, wrest both the capacity to invite and, in Edward Said’s words, “the permission to narrate” from Israeli control.

Watch the event here.

May 2022

Understanding our Kinship with Algae

Professor Jennifer Parker
Tuesday May 10th, 2022
6:30-8:00pm

The Algae Society BioArt Design Lab is a global collective of interdisciplinary researchers working together with algae as a non-human international research partner. As a collaborative group of artists, scientists and scholars, they experiment, design, and exhibit with algae, working from a companion and multispecies studies approach. They share their evolving interdisciplinary process, highlighting artistic works from Algae Society members and invited guests while reflecting on each researcher’s aim, process, materiality, and aesthetic considerations. With these works they endeavor to ignite societal behavioral shifts and direct action in response to the challenges that human-algal ecosystems face under climate change.

Watch the event here.

April 2022

The Easter Rising and New York: How Ireland’s Revolution Triggered a Fight Against Empire

Professor David Brundage
Monday, April 11th, 2022
6:30-8:00 p.m.  

This talk will assess the impact of the 1916 Easter Rising on a variety of anticolonial movements beyond Ireland and the Irish diaspora, focusing on New York City, long recognized as the overseas capital of Irish nationalist agitation and mobilization. But New York played a similar role for a variety of other descent groups and diasporas as well. After an overview of some of these non-Irish groups in the city (including African Americans and South Asians), this topic will be placed in the context of World War I and post-war efforts to end colonialism and foster self-determination for nations around the world. While some historians have emphasized the role of U.S. President Woodrow Wilson's ideas in these efforts, this talk will demonstrate the centrality of the Easter Rising and the subsequent Irish Revolution, as understood by both Irish and non-Irish intellectuals and political activists in the increasingly cosmopolitan city of New York.

Watch the event here.

March 2022

Human Genomics

Associate Professor Benedict Paten
Tuesday, March 15th, 2022
6:30-8:00 p.m.  

A complete human genome is around six billion DNA bases in length, half of which is inherited from each parent. In this talk, Associate Professor Benedict Paten will discuss some of the rapidly developing technologies we use to decode a genome will be explained, along with how we can use this knowledge to improve healthcare for many.

Watch the event here.

February 2022

What is the Dark Matter?

Professor Stefano Profumo
Monday, February 14th, 2022
6:30-8:00 p.m.  

Four fifths of the matter in the universe is made of something completely different from the "ordinary matter" we know and love. Professor Stefano Profumo will explain why this "dark matter" is an unavoidable ingredient to explain the universe as we observe it, and will describe what the fundamental, particle nature of the dark matter could possibly consist of. He will then give an overview of strategies to search for dark matter as a particle, describe a few examples of possible hints of discovery, and outline ways forward in this exciting hunt.

Watch the event here.

January 2022

Large Carnivore Behavior and Ecology in a Human Dominated World

Professor Chris Wilmers
Monday, January 11, 2021
6:30-8:00 p.m. 

Human activities dominate almost all regions of the globe. To persist in these human dominated areas, large carnivores must adjust their physiology, behavior and ecology and similarly, humans must be willing to accommodate these species through changes in business as usual. In this talk presented our research on large carnivores from the past 15 years and discuss some ways in which this balance is and is not being achieved.

Watch the event here. 

December 2021 

Professor Mark Amengual
Monday, December 13, 2021
6:30–8:00 p.m. 

In this talk, Professor Mark Amengual will discuss and dispel several myths about bilingualism and bilingual speech, offer an overview of the potential cognitive benefits of being bilingual, and conclude by providing evidence of the resourcefulness of bilinguals and multilinguals to overcome cross-language influence in their speech demonstrating the flexibility of their sound systems.


Watch the event here.

November 2021

Art, Animation & Politics-Creative Practice as Political Act

Professor Dee Hibbert Jones
Monday, November 8, 2021
6:30-8:00 p.m.

With a focus on her own creative practice, Art Professor Dee Hibbert-Jones explores the impact and challenges of a creative practice that intends to inform, persuade and examine power and politics.


Watch the event here.

October 2021

Michael M. Chemers, Director of Monster Studies
Monday, October 11, 2021
6:30-8:00 p.m.  

The act of monsterization is not, at its core, very mysterious. Whenever there is an epistemic break, different elements of society attempt to cope by locating the site of disturbance, identifying it as Other, and then mapping that category upon the bodies of the marginalized. The potential for the monster to play an important role in the envisioning of new and better worlds is one our students are hungry to learn.

Watch the event here. 
September 2021

Dr.Elizabeth Beaumont
Monday, September 13, 2021
6:30-8:00 p.m.
From the deadly "Unite the Right" rally in Charlottesville in 2018, to the role of white nationalists in the U.S. Capitol insurgency, recent events have spotlighted white supremacist groups. To grapple with these forces and broader problems of racism and inequality, we need a deeper understanding of the klan movement -- the Ku Klux Klan and loosely aligned white supremacist groups -- and its influence on American political development.
Event recording coming soon 
August 2021
Dr. Janette Dinishak
Monday, August 9, 2021
According to the neurodiversity perspective, some neurocognitive differences that are taken to be disorders should instead be understood as forms of human diversity. Proponents of this perspective, as it applies to autism, claim that autism is an ineliminable aspect of an autistic person’s identity and that atypical functioning and modes of experience associated with autism are made disabling by lack of accommodation by society, not by the condition itself. This talk will critically examine conceptual, ethical, and political dimensions of the neurodiversity perspective on autism to explore its significance both within the academy and outside it.
Dr.Jody Greene and Dr. Stephanie Chan
Monday, July 12, 2021
The COVID-19 pandemic has brought about, and will bring about, many permanent changes in college teaching and learning. From technologically-enhanced education to trauma-informed pedagogy, COVID has not only precipitated but also accelerated changes already under way at UCSC and elsewhere. Join UCSC Professor Jody Green in conversation with UCSC alumna and Foothill College Professor Stephanie Chan. Greene and Chan will discuss UCSC’s long history of educational innovation and what teaching and learning might look like post-pandemic. 
Watch the event here
May 2021
Professor Emeritus George Blumenthal
Watch the event here
Watch the event here
March 2021
Watch the event here
February 2021
Dr. Noah Wardrip-Fruin
Watch the event here
January 2021
Watch the event here

2020 

Archive

 

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December 2020
Professor John Jordan
November 2020
Professor Sylvanna M. Falcón
October 2020
Professor Douglas N.C Lin

 

September 2020
Online Groceries: eCommerce, the pandemic & the future of work in retail food
Professor Chris Benner

August 2020
Beyond the Middle Passage: Slave Trading within the Americas, 1619-1807
Professor Greg O'Malley

July 2020
Mercury in Coastal Fog – Evidence for Bioaccumulation in Food Webs
Professor Peter Weiss-Penzias
June 2020
There Are No Single-Player Video Games
Professor Michael John
May 2020
Emerging From the Job Market Chaos: A More Successful You?
Dean of UC Santa Cruz Extension P.K. Agarwal

April 2020
The Arts at the Center of Software

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March 2020
Death on the Nile:
A 3D Visit to Egypt's Most Enduring Cemetery
Professor Elaine Sullivan

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February 2020
BioEngineering for Social Good
Professor David Bernick

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January 2020
India's Economic Future: The Promise and the Peril
Professor Nirvikar Singh

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2019

Archive

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December 2019
Reading Hamlet Now
Professor Sean Keilen

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November 2019
Quantum Materials and Bioelectronics: Promising Breakthroughs in Materials Science
Professor David Lederman

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October 2019
Vampires in Love
Professor Kim Lau

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September 2019
Can we do better than nature? – Taming biology to advance technology and medicine
Assistant Professor Marcella Gomez

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August 2019
Exploring CA Wines: A Workshop Involving Art, Science, Swirling, and Sipping
Professor Phillip Crews

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July 2019
How We Know When the Song is Over: Rhythm Perception, Musical Form, and Theories of Mind
Professor Ben Leeds Carson

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June 2019
The 1930s: The Past of Our Present?
Professor Marc Matera

Sorry, no photos from this event

May 2019
Sanctuary: the Role of Faith-Based Organizations in Providing Refuge to Migrants
Dean Katharyne Mitchell

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April 2019
Germ Cells and Epigenetic Memory Across Generations
Professor Susan Strome

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March 2019
Polarization and Public Discourse: How We Got Here and What We Do Now
Professor Jon Ellis and Graduate Student Juan Ruiz

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February 2019
How Health Insurance Impacts Lives: Findings and Policies
Professor Carlos Dobkin

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January 2019

Challenges on the Edge: Climate Change, Sea-Level Rise and the Future of California's Coast
Professor Gary Griggs

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2018

Archive

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December 2018
Dickens and the Struggles of Marriage
Assistant Professor Renée Fox

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November 2018
Navigating a Whitewater World:
Exploring the Role of Technology for Social Good
Assistant Professor David Lee

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October 2018
When Drugs Became Global:
Technologies of Intoxication in the Enlightenment
Professor Ben Breen

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September 2018
Women in Early Hollywood: The Untold Story
Professor Shelley Stamp

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August 2018
Preserving Research Data in the Trump Administration
Professor Lindsey Dillon

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July 2018
Deep Video Gaming: Adding Collaboration, Empathy, Diversity, & Enlightenment to Games
Associate Professor Robin Hunicke

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June 2018
Heroes aren't born. They're built.
Human Joint Mimicry in Next-Generation Robots
Professor Mircea Teodorescu

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May 2018
Fighting Molecular War on Childhood Viruses
Professor Rebecca Dubois

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April 2018
What We Can and Cannot Predict about Earthquakes
Professor Emily Brodsky

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March 2018
Exotic Solar Systems on the Path to Earth-Like Planets
Professor Jonathan Fortney

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February 2018
The Future of Organic Farming
Christof Bernau, Farm Garden Manager

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